How to Replace Your Vehicle's Radiator Fan.
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How to Replace Your Vehicle's Radiator Fan.

If you have an ownerÂ’s manual or a Chilton book on your vehicle I would suggest that you use it. I have one and it has benefited me over the years many times over. Note that every car is different so you will need to know a few things to make sure you get the right part. The first thing I would do is to make sure your radiator fan is in a location you can access yourself.

Everyone would like to save a little money. Being able to do the easy maintenance or repairs on your car will do just that. Sometimes when your car overheats it could be due to several things from water pump, to coolant levels, and other things as well. One inexpensive thing you can replace that can cause overheating is your radiator fan. This article will tell you what you need to know to do it yourself.

If you have an owner’s manual or a Chilton book on your vehicle I would suggest that you use it. I have one and it has benefited me over the years many times over. Note that every car is different so you will need to know a few things to make sure you get the right part. The first thing I would do is to make sure your radiator fan is in a location you can access yourself.

Your radiator fan is mounted on the back of your radiator. It should turn on if your relay is not defective when your engine reaches a specific temperature. You can test your relay by removing it and affixing jumper wires in its place. If when you turn on your car the fan does not power up then it is not your relay. The relay is around $9 for my car but may vary for each make and model. The only reason you will even need to worry about this being a problem is if your car is overheating and the fan is not turning on. If replacing the relay/fuse does not solve the problem then most likely it is your fan motor.

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/parts/1994-Saturn-SL1/Relay-Radiator-Cooling-Fan-Motor/_/N-j171xZ9cj89?filterByKeyWord=radiator+fan+motor&fromString=search

The example vehicle used in this article is my 94 Saturn SL1 with single overhead cam engine and manual transmission. My local Autozone carries the part for as low as $26.99 but I need it in a hurry so I have to go with one a bit higher in price to have my car back on the road sooner. It will cost me in store $36.99 and like the relay it will have a Limited Lifetime Warranty through the store. Doing this job myself would save me at least and saved me possibly $150 or more. Current shop rates can run as high as $77 per hour plus parts and fluids. Once I obtained my part I need to remove the old part. To do this you will need to check what tools you will need. For me I needed a 10mm socket.

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/parts/Continental-Radiator-Fan-Motor/1994-Saturn-SL1/_/N-j171xZ8ii2e?counter=1&filterByKeyWord=radiator+fan+motor&fromString=search&itemIdentifier=129805_0_0_5281

Removing my fan requires disconnecting a plug in the back of the motor that feeds it power. After disconnecting the wire I found there is a single bolt mounting it in place and three supports that rest in brackets. I remove the single 10mm bolt with my socket and carefully lift the entire fan away from the radiator so not to damage the radiator. Note that this should not be done while the engine is hot.

With the fan fixture removed you can easily remove the motor from the fan through a series of bolts. Replace it with the new motor and replace it exactly as you removed it, carefully. After remounting the fan back in the opposite fashion, plug in the power wire and test it again. If your fan works, Job well done! If it does not work then you may have a more serious electrical problem.

For more information about me as a writer, please check out http://kevin-davison.webnode.com/, http://authorkevincdavison.blogspot.com/, and http://write-for-a-cause.blogspot.com/.

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